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Boeing 737 MAX mid-air emergencies revealed as US agency prepares to probe production issues

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Boeing's troubled 737 MAX planes — which have twice crashed, killing 346 people — have experienced at least six mid-air emergencies and dozens of groundings in the year after an extensive probe cleared them to fly. (www.abc.net.au) Mehr...

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patpylot
patrick baker 11
in the article a boeing spokesperson said these incidents do not reflect a trend. In whose universe?
A series of disabling events necessitating putting the inflight max on the ground very quicky. Not too many of each type of malfunction but many varied malfunctions over the last year of return to service of the BOeing Bucking Bronco, the max. A series of somethings are not cured or fixed, and if/when enough anomalies occur at the same time, another Max could bite the dust. Max will not fly for years if/when that happens, boeing cash-salvation cow will not give more milk, and the 787 and 777X will not have the funding to fix their dramas too. ALl this going in with the full agreement of the executives (calhoon) and the board of directors. Calhoon is in cahoots with the board on this nonsense. That puts the company in the toilet, out of business, bankrupt and the figurehead CEO and BOard of Directors will have been the cause. All in plain sight, in front of us all, carefully explained away by the guilty parties. Stop the nonsense. March Calhoon and his board of rubber stampers out the door, preferebly a third floor door, and find new folks to run this company and fix its procedures.
yr2012
matt jensen 5
when did all this greed start?
Seems to me, that it all worked pretty well until 2000
ColinSeftel
Colin Seftel 4
Read this article which traces the change in corporate culture to 1997, with Boeing’s “reverse takeover” of McDonnell Douglas; so-called because it was McDonnell executives who perversely ended up in charge of the combined entity, and it was McDonnell’s culture that became ascendant. “McDonnell Douglas bought Boeing with Boeing’s money,” went the joke around Seattle.
https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/11/how-boeing-lost-its-bearings/602188/
ColinSeftel
Colin Seftel 2
All documented in this excellent video documentary on Netflix: https://www.netflix.com/za/title/81272421
alexa320
alex hidveghy 2
Seen it! Good documentary…..
druck13
druck13 4
I'd start by putting every MAX in the crusher, it's beyond fixing.
Then ensure every new Boeing model has to be certified from scratch, no more grandfathering on top of 60 year old designs.
Most importantly, nothing should be self certified by Boeing or any other manufacturer ever again.
wiregold
wiregold 7
"The Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines accidents have been reviewed by numerous governmental and regulatory entities, and none of those reviews have found that production conditions in the factory contributed to the accidents," a Boeing spokeswoman said."
The Boeing spokeswoman neglects the fact production facilities were NOT investigated by governmental nor regulatory agencies.
Bratfalken
Jan Strömbäck 2
When you reach to find something positive to mention, even if it is by saying something that hasn't been said because it wasn't investigated. And I belive that the production conditions was okey, they did what they had been instructed by the construction department, and those guys tried to fulfill what management and salesoperatives promised to customers, even if it meant "making magic with your knees"! As usual when products are sold without asking IF it is possible!
Bandrunner
Bandrunner 2
Nope.
If I were booked on a 737 MAX I'd cancel and get on something else.
mikehe
Mike Hindson-Evans 3
I feel sorry for Boeing (self-inflicted) and the crews. At least passengers have a choice.

We recently completed eight flights in a two-week period, including transatlantic and around Europe. One 787-10 (BA's second, enjoying the new Club World mini-suites) an A330 (enjoying Aer Lingus' business class cabin back across the Pond); plus six flights on Airbus A320/319 family aircraft. Walked away from each landing.

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