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  • 46

Southwest removes Boeing 737 Max from flight schedule through early August as grounding persists

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Southwest Airlines has removed the Boeing 737 Max jet from its schedule through Aug. 5, a key summer travel period. It’s unclear how many Southwest flights will be canceled as a result. Southwest suspended all 34 of its Max jets from its fleet of more than 750 Boeing 737 models after the Max’s anti-stall software was implicated in an Ethiopian crash in March that killed 157 people (www.cnbc.com) Mehr...

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Baker2390
Dick Smith 2
This pretty well nails it: https://spectrum.ieee.org/aerospace/aviation/how-the-boeing-737-max-disaster-looks-to-a-software-developer
japanjeff
japanjeff 1
Excellent article! As a software developer myself, I've had a lot of the same questions that the author mentions.
rartac
Robert Artac 3
Regardless, the software seems to be at fault for erroneously forcing the system to activate. Seeing as there was little to no official training (there was some campfire knowledge about it in the US) on the MCAS system how would you expect any pilot to successfully recover except for accidentally doing the right thing?
bentwing60
bentwing60 2
"gain, pitch + power = performance. Airspeed indicator failure and stick pusher be damned. Those are bandaids for sub par pilots who grew up playing video games and clueless as to how to fly a wounded bird".

recognize this, you said it a couple of days ago, and if accidentally doing the right thing is following the checklist for a stab trim runaway then I question your thought process for what is going on here, especially as a purported ATP. The reality that the engagement of the auto throttles question has not really been addressed in either scenario and the fact that they both hit the dirt at over 400 knts. might beg the question of why weren't the throttles at idle. Manual stab trim will not overcome aerodynamic forces for which they were not designed to address.


FedExCargoPilot
FedExCargoPilot 1
Unless the speed was selected at 400 knots (unlikely) wouldn't the throttles be at idle anyways?
bentwing60
bentwing60 2
If they didn't recognize a stab trim runaway as the core problem, and were completely lost on what was going on, the throttles would have been at idle, yet they wrern't, ergo behind the airplane the whole way. JMHO
FedExCargoPilot
FedExCargoPilot 1
So auto thrust was not engaged? Strange they were not at idle...
FedExCargoPilot
FedExCargoPilot 1
Unless they turned it off..I see what you mean
bentwing60
bentwing60 1
Sadly, there was not enough left to tell, except for the ads-b data and the cvr-dvr data that I have not yet seen. As a FEDEX guy, how can you hit the dirt at 400 knts. with the throttles at idle? I can't comprehend it, yet here we are.
Steve1822
Steve1822 0
The grounding of the B737 Max is unfortunate, as is the loss of life in the two crashes. (Lion Air and Eh But one (pro or airline pilot) must wonder, after reading the technical data to date of what happened and what pilot actions were applied or (not) applied......would there have been a different outcome had a US trained (and experienced Boeing driver) been at the controls. The positive outcome of revised software and more enhanced documentation on differences training is welcome. Clearly, ICAO should review international standards of minimum experience and training due to all the new technology that has come out in the last 10 years. One thing never goes out of date is basic flying skills.
bentwing60
bentwing60 -5
A voice in the forest. There is no way an ab initio guy with 350 TT (EA 302) FO knows how to fly a 737 Max, let alone understand the complexity of the automation that is controlling the beast with his or her button pushing. Ergo, a single pilot operation in 121 while these ab initios get their feet wet. Remember Kit Darby, he told us every other ad that there was gonna be an acute shortage of pilots in the 80's and 90's. So take his "how to apply at a 121 carrier program" and you get a job. He is finally right, but probably dead.
Highflyer1950
Highflyer1950 1
Absolutely correct.
bentwing60
bentwing60 -3
My humblest apologies to Kit Darby as the last part of my last statement as to his probable demise was in error! For you budding ATP's with a 121 goal, he is still coaching and his site is referenced below. For you folks wishing for a flying career with a bit less structure i.e., corporate, management companies, fractionals and No seniority #, they are feeling the shortage as well and fly newer more tech. advanced stuff and are more appealing in my book. It ain't all about Max. takeoff weight or wing span.

http://kitdarby.com/wp/
Firewalled1
Firewalled1 1
Ok Good Enough. The 737 Max is flawed. Certainly in 3rd world countries. Now are we to really believe that SW and others are really going to be put in a total loss of revenue situation because 34 airplanes have been grounded out of 700+?
nasdisco
Chris B -2
I've got no doubt the Max family will take to the air again with paying passengers. It cannot be allowed to be approved just by the FAA/Trump, but by each and every government around the world that approves aircraft for operation.

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