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Emergency oxygen masks removed from airline lavatories

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The federal government has ordered safety equipment be removed from 6,000 commercial passenger planes, and the Federal Aviation Administration kept the decision to do it a secret. It is officially called Air Worthiness Directive 2011-04-09 ... that orders airlines to remove the emergency oxygen generators from all lavatories. The airlines completed the work on the 6,000 aircraft in the U.S. fleet on Friday, March 4. (www.click2houston.com) Mehr...

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dbaker
Daniel Baker 0
I think oxygen is far more important for crew than passengers. In theory, after a rapid decompression, the aircraft will begin an emergency descent and soon be low enough to be at an altitude with breathable air.

However, what is the risk that's being prevented?
GuyPigg
Guy Pigg 0
My question exactly. What is the threat?
pussntoots
Steve Pusey 0
Mr. Baker is correct, and so is the statement in the article that the flight attendants will take care of anyone in the lavatory.
The headline on this story is very inaccurate, misleading, sensatonalist and foolish. The FAA didn't do it "in secret." This is an example of very poor reporting, originally by a TV station.
dhut1
DARRELL HUTCHINS 0
Lets just quit flying. Flying itself is becoming a threat.
sfjaero
SF Johannsen 0
What else do you think the FAA and airlines should be removing besides the o2 generators from lavatories on commercial aircrafts?
dhut1
DARRELL HUTCHINS 0
Another question we should ask ourselves... Will this make you feel safer?
dhut1
DARRELL HUTCHINS 0
maybe they should do away with the lavatories altogether. need the bathroom raise your hand and the plane would land at the nearest airport. Then resume your flight once you finished your business.
Wingscrubber
Wingscrubber 0
My conspiracy theory is that this is a financially motivated AD, because removing the equipment can save weight, which improves fuel economy. Penny pinching. Wonder who at the FAA took the bribe.
jsterner
Jerry Sterner 0
The reason they took them out is because the generators actually heat up to create oxygen. Conceivably they could be accessed by a terrorist and start a fire.
dhut1
DARRELL HUTCHINS 0
fly below 14000 ft and no o2 is needed. then everyone is safe (according to the TSA/FAA)
Wingscrubber
Wingscrubber 0
Ok, I retract my conspriacy theory, I see now that they can be dangerous;
http://www.avoxsys.com/pdf/brochures/ChemicalOxygenGenerators900.pdf
I'm normally holding my breath in the lav anyway :)
mhoppes
Matt Hoppes 0
I'm rather appalled by it. Even though the chance of a rapid depressurization event happening is very slim... it must happen often enough that the FAA mandated that oxygen masks be put into aircraft to begin with.

I thought a call to the FAA to "alert" them to this dangerous situation was in order, but they didn't seem to want to help.... take a listen:

http://www.wikiupload.com/download/do_download?key=7CTCQB4XJ5C0GFW
mhoppes
Matt Hoppes 0
I'm rather appalled by it. Even though the chance of a rapid depressurization event happening is very slim... it must happen often enough that the FAA mandated that oxygen masks be put into aircraft to begin with.

I thought a call to the FAA to "alert" them to this dangerous situation was in order, but they didn't seem to want to help.... take a listen:

[http://www.wikiupload.com/download/do_download?key=7CTCQB4XJ5C0GFW Click to Listen]
mhoppes
Matt Hoppes 0
Apparently the link went bad. Try this:
http://www.wikiupload.com/7CTCQB4XJ5C0GFW

You'll have to click the Download link... the direct link seemed to not work any longer.
mhoppes
Matt Hoppes 0
Here's another link incase that one doesn't work:
https://www.yousendit.com/download/eURCeVduT2JKV05jR0E9PQ
atlwatchdog
Watch Dog 0
Oxygen generators are what brought down Valujet 592.

As for this: "If you have a rapid decompression and you're in the bathroom, there's a good chance you won't survive it, and the rest of the airplane will," the airline industry source said.

This news retards need a new industry source. Rapid decompression is a very survivable event. As Daniel said, it is much more important the crew is breathing oxygen and can bring the aircraft down to a safe altitude in less than 5 minutes.

Passengers may pass out, but they will regain conciousness. Only here who has done altitude chamber training up to 25,000 feet knows you can go for several minutes before passing out.

An commercial airline flightdeck crew will have the aircraft from the mid 30s down to less than 15,000 feet in less than 5 minutes.

Remove the oxygen generators from the bathroom. Hell, you want to prevent terrorism, remove all of them, liquor the passengers up with free booze, and keep the cabin altitude around 15,000.

No seriously, remove the things from the lavs. Who cares. This is just another prime example of the media trying to sensationalize a story.
atlwatchdog
Watch Dog 0
Meant to say "Anyone here who has..."
atlwatchdog
Watch Dog 0
Why my typing may not always be spot on...

You Mr. Hoppes are an idiot. You repeated verbatim everything which was written in the article. I can tell from your podcast that you have not the first clue about what it is exactly that you are talking about in regards to safety or aviation in general.

Frankly, you should be quite ashamed at yourself for posting this crap out here on the internet.

I tell you what, give me a link to the A.D., and I'll retract my statement. You find this specific one, and provide the link, and I'll say that you actually researched this before running off with the commentary posted in the original article.
atlwatchdog
Watch Dog 0
Here Mr. Hoppes, I'll help you out. You want to talk to somebody about this, then call the folks below. BTW, this came directly from the A.D.

Please, go do research before blasting off like an idiot and shooting from the hip.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jeff Gardlin, Aerospace Engineer, Cabin Safety Branch, ANM-115, FAA, Transport Airplane Directorate, 1601 Lind Avenue, SW., Renton, Washington 98057-3356; telephone 425-227-2136; fax 425-227-1149; e-mail jeff.gardlin@faa.gov

or

Robert Hettman, Aerospace Engineer, Propulsion and Mechanical Systems Branch, ANM-112, FAA, Transport Airplane Directorate, 1601 Lind Avenue, SW., Renton, Washington 98057-3356; telephone (425) 227-2683; fax (425) 227-1149; e-mail robert.hettman@faa.gov

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