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  • 19

Plane with malfunctioning landing gear to make emergency landing at DIA

Übermittelt
 
... The plane is a midsized twin jet-engine corporate Hawker 800. It took off from Centennial Airport and has been circling the area trying to burn off fuel before making an emergency landing.... (kdvr.com) Mehr...

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[This poster has been suspended.]

Bernie20910
Bernie20910 5
Two different types of media, and they should be held to two different types of standards. In entertainment media I'm willing to give them a lot of slack. Maybe not mid-air aircraft type changes, but I don't expect everything to be 100% factual (unless it's a documentary, or something of that nature.)

The news media, on the other hand, needs to be held to much higher level standards. I expect (and thus am constantly disappointed) a news organizations reports to be fair, accurate, unbiased and completely factual.

Yeah, I know I have a better chance of hitting the lottery three times in one day, but, damnit, they have a responsibility to the public to meet those standards.
joelwiley
joel wiley 4
The problem is when the news media (Who What When Where Why) confuses itself with the entertainment (Ooh Twinky) media.
sparkie624
sparkie624 4
They ignore their responsibility in so many ways... It is about making it sound exciting so they get better advertising dollars...
Bernie20910
Bernie20910 1
Exactly.
AWAAlum
AWAAlum 1
Only thing is, then it ceases to be "news" and is just another video. That means the media just isn't doing its job of informing the public, rather, it's attempting to entertain the public. Boooooooo!
btweston
btweston 2
You're right. The movie Airplane! was quite unrealistic...
AWAAlum
AWAAlum 1
Yeah but it wasn't meant to be factual or "news" - it was a Hollywood film meant purely to entertain.
Bernie20910
Bernie20910 4
"Private jet makes emergency belly landing at DIA"... as opposed to a non-emergency belly landing?
sparkie624
sparkie624 -2
"Private jet makes emergency belly landing at DEN" or "Private jet makes emergency belly landing at KDEN" would be more accurate!
preacher1
preacher1 1
Funny thing though; even being used to KDEN thru the world of officialdom, when I saw this headline, I had no problem recognizing that it was Denver.
sparkie624
sparkie624 1
First think I did was to go search KDIA on airnav.com
Steve1822
Steve1822 1
Technically speaking? Yes. Traveling public or average reader reading the story? DIA. The above average reader? DEN = the Denver International Airport.
joelwiley
joel wiley 4
I wonder if the average reader would understand that Denver is in Colorado.
AWAAlum
AWAAlum 1
Oh come on!
joelwiley
joel wiley 1
Perhaps an exaggeration, but not by much given the current state of education IMO.
Bernie20910
Bernie20910 1
Not an exaggeration at all. I recall seeing the same program not all that long ago.
sparkie624
sparkie624 1
Probably not.... Most people think that Kansas City, MO is in KS, and I once saw a program featuring an on the street interviewer asking random questions.. One question was "What state is Washington DC in?" 6 out of 10 they asked that question to said Washington State,and one said in California.
joelwiley
joel wiley 1
There is one in Kansas, just not the big one everyone thinks of.
http://www.wycokck.org/
sparkie624
sparkie624 2
I know... But note, I said Kansas City Missouri...
edgeair
edgeair 1
I live in Stillwater, OK and it bugs me more than it should that the busses' say "STW Airport" instead of "SWO Airport" our airport code is SWO.
THRUSTT
THRUSTT 2
Nowhere half as bad as when you're going to TEB or EWR, and some moron says, "oh, you're going to New York!!!"
sparkie624
sparkie624 1
Well in NY I do not expect anything to make since, so that is ok in NY.
gearup328
Peter Steitz 2
At Republic Airways several years ago we had an ERJ 170 depart from DFW to IAD. Upon gear retraction, the gear handle would not come up. Ah ha! The aircraft thought it was still on the ground. The crew elected to use the over ride (the checklist said this was OK) and brought the gear up. Arriving at Dulles, the nose gear would not come down. About an hour of fuel burn, they landed nose gear up. The nose wheel steering had malfunctioned and the wheel came up into the well at an angle and got stuck there. Lesson learned--if the gear is down and won't come up--leave it down and land. The checklist was changed after that.
k9wrangler
Karl Scribner 2
The arguing over the use of DIA is silly, the fire rescue truck that goes by clearly says DIA in big letters on its side adjacent to where it says Denver International Airport. I guess the abbreviation police need to check that out.
ChrisMD123
ChrisMD123 1
There's a joke about ARFF and abbreviation police in there somewhere...
paultrubits
paul trubits 2
If you want to make some easy bar bet money, ask some one what state is Cincinnati's airport located.
sparkie624
sparkie624 1
LOL... You got that one right.... I work that airport all the time, it catches everyone.
preacher1
preacher1 1
Bernie20910
Bernie20910 1
KLUK? What's the deal? The map seems to show it in Ohio, just east of the city.
sparkie624
sparkie624 2
KLUK is "Cincinnati Municipal Airport-Lunken Field", However most of the traffic goes through KCVG which is actually in "Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport". KLUK does not really handle airline traffic, so the correct answer would be "Covington, Kentucky"
ChrisMD123
ChrisMD123 2
Hebron, Kentucky - despite the name. Covington was the closest city when the airport was planned, but there's now a town/CDP there called Hebron.

That's why it's double-or-nothing on the city.
Bernie20910
Bernie20910 1
Thanks. I live within driving distance of there, so I've never had occasion to fly into Cincinatti. When I typed in the city in the Airport Info box here on FA, that's what came up, not KCVG.
ChrisMD123
ChrisMD123 1
If they get it right, double or nothing on which city it's actually in.
LordLayton
Those planes are built with a Beryllium strip on the belly designed to cause minimal damage to the aircraft in just that situation
Bernie20910
Bernie20910 2
Yeah, I read that in the article too and, while it probably does help keep the damage to a minimum, I have to question the wisdom of using it in that particular application. Beryllium dust is extremely toxic if inhaled, and grinding a strip of it down a runway is sure as heck going to create a long strip of beryllium contaminated dust. Anyone in the area without respiratory protection is then at risk of inhaling the dust and being affected by it. That would include rescue workers, pax, and cleanup crew afterwards.
sparkie624
sparkie624 -1
that plane was built before the EPA & OSHA crap to deal with.. Probably grand fathered on that one.
Bernie20910
Bernie20910 1
Hardly. First flight is listed as 1983. I wonder if the people working at the airport were informed about the potential lethal effects of the dust?
sparkie624
sparkie624 1
The EPA got started in 1970, but they really did not start getting teeth to do much until the 90's.... I remember we used to use a chemical known as TEK which was Tetra-ethyl-chloride and is so far gone because of how bad it was.... To use it you would use 2 pairs of rubber gloves. When you gloves got warm you would change them, and that would not take long... Spray bottles of this stuff would only last a day or 2... It was taken off the market, but would clean anything... Very bad stuff... But the EPA did not remove it until the mid 90's... I have used this stuff many times....
Bernie20910
Bernie20910 1
Sure you don't mean Tetra-Ethyl-Ketone? Or Methyl-Ethyl-Ketone (MEK)?
AWAAlum
AWAAlum 1
Is that the stuff they used to refer to as "foaming" when a flight came in w/o its landing gear locked down?
sparkie624
sparkie624 1
If you are talking about TEK, the answer is NO... This stuff is a cleaner.... It will clean any paint off anything in seconds, and clean your bones of your skin as well if it gets on you...
Champdriver
jim gevay 2
On the Hawkers both the gear and flaps are hydraulic operated with a pump on each engine and a common reservoir. There is also a separate system for extending the gear and flaps with another reservoir and a hand pump in the cockpit.

Also, what is a HA800XP, the proper manufacturers designation is HS 125-800XP, the HS stands for Hawker Siddeley, the original manufacture.
gearup328
Peter Steitz 1
Thanks Jim for trying to bring this thread back into the original topic. Like the preacher said--it's too late now. Guys are STILL posting about the name of the airport.
sparkie624
sparkie624 3
Note the idiot reporter does not even know what airport she is at... Even though it is "Denver International Airport", it is actually DEN - These reporters are stupid and desperate... Just like the one who report the names of the 3 crew on Asiana 214 with one of the pilots listed as "WeTooLow"... We need some real reporters that can give us real news and be accurate about it.
CaptainFreedom
CaptainFreedom 4
Don't forget the other 2 cohorts of Wi Tu Lo, Ho Lee Fuk, Bang Ding Ow, and Captain Sum Ting Wong.
Bernie20910
Bernie20910 5
Wait... whut? You want accuracy AND facts from the media? Whoa... You're getting pretty radical there buddy.
sparkie624
sparkie624 2
Yup... the news industry needs to be held accountable for what they report...
Steve1822
Steve1822 3
I think you as the reader maybe the idiot. DIA is the common abbreviation for referencing (Denver International Airport) and correct from the reporters standpoint. What you are referring to is the aviation industry term. The ICAO identification is KDEN and the airline identification (ATA) and FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) reference is DEN. Do your homework before you spout off.
ChrisMD123
ChrisMD123 2
Calling Denver International Airport "DIA" is akin to calling Chicago-O'Hare International Airport "O'Hare." It's a nickname, not an official designator. It would be commonly understood by the target audience of a Denver-area news station.

Do two Google News searches, one for "Denver airport DEN" and one for "Denver airport DIA." Note that the local Denver news stations are essentially the only results in the second one because it's a relatively local nickname. And note that KDVR is a Denver area news station.
sparkie624
sparkie624 0
OHare airport is internationally known.... Everyone has known that for decades.... Same thing for Dulles, Heathrow and others.... But if you are in Japan talking to a local and tell them you are traveling to DIA they are going to give you a very funny look, and wonder what in the world you are talking about.
ChrisMD123
ChrisMD123 2
I disagree with your premise, but I understand it. I would argue, however, that there's a huge difference between a local news article and a conversation in Japan.
Bernie20910
Bernie20910 0
You're missing one of the points being made though, that there's no such thing as a "local audience" anymore, and when stories are picked up and repeated by other media outside of the immediate area the nicknames lead to confusion and miscommunication.
ChrisMD123
ChrisMD123 2
As I wrote to sparkie624, I disagree with that premise. Who in Singapore is looking around for articles about some place called DIA? Plus, the first line of the article spells it out: "Denver International Airport."

I think that the argument also gives people too much credit for knowing IATA or ICAO codes. They really don't. ACRP 52 suggests that a significant portion of people arriving at an airport don't even know what airline they're flying.

So in a Venn diagram, the confused people are at the center of "Knows every IATA and ICAO code" and "Doesn't know the vernacular name of Denver International Airport." That's a small intersection.

Finally, all nomenclature is ambiguous. Perfect example: "PHL" isn't just Philadelphia International Airport, it's also a widely recognized abbreviation for the Philippines.
Bernie20910
Bernie20910 0
The only one who mentioned Singapore is you. As you yourself stated further up in this branch, only locals use the DIA nickname, as per your Google search. I agree with that statement, that DIA is the "local vernacular" for the airport, only used and understood by those in the immediate area. So why then is it so hard for you to see that this then can cause confusion and misunderstandings when a story using it circulates outside of that immediate area?
WeatherWise
WeatherWise 3
Los Angeles International is known as LAX and that's what everyone out here calls it, be it pilot, media or whatever. No one is calling it LIA.
Steve1822
Steve1822 2
Thats becuase it has (always) been LAX = Los Angeles International Airport. Not so with DEN.
WeatherWise
WeatherWise 1
Gotcha...distinguishing the new from the old. Too bad they couldn't change the identifier to KDIA as it appears to be available.
sparkie624
sparkie624 1
I would not want them to do that... That would cause some confusion as big as they are today.
sparkie624
sparkie624 1
What did DEN used to be known as.. They have been DEN since I have been in the industry..
Thumpkady
Steve Kady 2
The old airport was Stapleton International. This one is Denver International, thus DIA
preacher1
preacher1 2
Maybe to the locals but not ICAO or the FAA
khaiduk
Kevin Haiduk 1
When I first read it I thought Dulles. I skimmed through the article looking at the video. Then I remembered oh that's IAD. Maybe this guy is referring to the old Denver airport Stapleton - but that was still DEN if I remember correctly.
Thumpkady
Steve Kady 1
Denver has always be known as DEN. DIA came about when the built it and someone named it DIA. They had to sell the new airport to the public and the letters DIA are much easier to associate the public with than DEN> How dumb would it sound if a reporter said, "reporting live from DEN, I'm....?
Get the point?
Bernie20910
Bernie20910 1
Print story, not a live broadcast. How dumb would it sound if the reporter ended it with "Reporting live from..."?
sparkie624
sparkie624 -2
If they report a particular airport, they should use the ICAO... If you cannot see that Steve, then you are the IDIOT!
pthomas745
Pa Thomas 5
Everybody knows what DIA is: Denver Imaginary Airport
Steve1822
Steve1822 4
Any by the way Sparke.......your profile says your a "student pilot". If you are still are a student pilot please stop. In my 46 years in aviaton I have met and instructed a lot of pilots. They were humble, anxious to learn. You come across as a critical, know it all. A very dangerous trait in a pilot. My posts are meant to get your attention. Hopefully you'll learn something.
sparkie624
sparkie624 -2
I am also a Well Seasoned Part 121 Mechanic of over 27 years, and have 6 years of Airline Maintenance Control Experience. I have probably worked on more different types of planes that you have flown. As you can see I am well seasoned in the airline industry and have talked with many pilots that should not be, and many of them are flying people around the world every day. I will update my profile.
Steve1822
Steve1822 5
Sparkie24, you seem to have all the answers. Enjoy your career.
Steve1822
Steve1822 3
Keep in mind sparkie, the reporter is reporting to the general population. Locally and travel industry wide............Denver International Airport is now referred to as DIA. That is stated in the article up front for identification. Same as Department of Defense (DOD). The fact that the reporter did not use the aviation terminology does not make her "a idiot reporter". Now if we go back to 1995 yes, DEN would be more accurate because DEN was Stapleton International Airport. Everyone knew that. Now DEN or KDEN is commonly referred to as DIA by the traveling public. There are other airports near Denver. And yes I can see that, so get off your high horse. She correctly ID'd the airport for 99% of the readers. Any experienced pilot knows that. As a 36 year retired pilot I know that DEN, KDEN is Denver International. I also know the public refers to the same airport as DIA. Sheesh. Come on Sparkie.
sparkie624
sparkie624 0
I know they are reporting to the general population... that is what makes them dangerous.
creece211
Chris Reece 2
You must not be from or live in the Denver area. The term "DIA" has been used by everyone in the area for years...the news isn't going to use ICAO terms because 99% of the people watching have no idea what ICAO is...oh, and try having more respect for people when you reply next time. You know the phrase: "Takes One to Know One"
Steve1822
Steve1822 2
You know that. I know that. But this sparkie624 person needs a smart slap upside the head.
Bernie20910
Bernie20910 1
In this day and age, where news stories are repeated globally, the use of local abbreviations and terms that go against the accepted standard industry terms should probably be avoided. There is no such thing as a local news story anymore. Indeed, one of my pet peeves these days is stories that were written for a small "local" audience, which don't specify a location much more than a town name, or locally known landmark name, being picked up and distributed in other newspapers or news sites, leaving the reader absolutely clueless as to where it took place. Most of the time you can't tell what state, and sometimes not even what country the story is from. If I were to post up a story from a local paper, talking about events that took place in London, would you know they meant London, Kentucky and not London, England? The use of standardized place names and standardized identification abbreviations helps to avoid such problems, and should probably be taught in journalism classes, if they even have such things anymore. Probably got dropped along with the classes on spelling, punctuation and grammar...
sparkie624
sparkie624 0
This news went international... News did not stay local... I have worked with DEN for a long time, but never as DIA.
btweston
btweston 0
hatehatehatehatehatehatehate
THRUSTT
THRUSTT 0
Show some love...
preacher1
preacher1 2
We spend 3 times the amount arguing about an airport code rather than talking about why he couldn't extend and belly landed safely. Pitiful what this site has degraded too. I got to fall in on DIA for local recognition, if there is a side to choose. I doubt most of local and non flying public would know what DEN was.
toolguy105
toolguy105 1
I believe DIA or KDIA was the designation for the old airport. DEN was the designation or KDEN given to the new airport. I do not remember why the new desognation was given since the old airport was going to be demolished bu then again I guess it is hard to teach old reporters new tricks.
AirBalance
Jeff Lewis 1
I am fairly sure that while Stapleton (DEN) was still in use and the big new airport was being built, there was a requirement for a second designation. DIA was the new airport designation and, I think it was a year or so later, with Stapleton (the old DEN) fully decommissioned, that DIA was then replaced with DEN.

My guess is FAA feared someone would attempt an instrument approach in rare heavy IMC while perhaps using a Stapleton chart and create a REAL news story. So, they had to buffer in time on the cutover from Stapleton to DIA, before they could normalize the airport code.
sparkie624
sparkie624 0
Doing a good search for KDIA does not exist. It has been KDEN since before the 70's at least... It has been a long enough ago that it should not even be considered an issue...

You are correct... It is harder to teach a old dog new tricks and it is even hard to get a reporter to do their job correctly and accurately
toolguy105
toolguy105 2
According to Wikipedia; the Airports original name was Stapleton International Airport was Denver, Colorado's primary airport from 1929 to 1995. At different times it served as a hub for TWA, People Express, Frontier Airlines, Western Airlines, Continental Airlines and United Airlines.

In 1995, Stapleton was replaced by Denver International Airport. It has now been decommissioned and the airport property was redeveloped as a retail and residential neighborhood.

Having worked at JFK from 1970 to 1973 I remember referring to Denver as, Denver Stapleton or DIA which is probably why the name changed to Denver international before it closed. I sort of liked the Name Denver Stapleton it had pizzazz.
paultrubits
paul trubits 1
Washington, dc was in Maryland when it was created.
AWAAlum
AWAAlum 0
What in the sam hill does that have to do with a malfunctioning landing gear landing?
sparkie624
sparkie624 0
Well... We have a malfunctioning gear in Denver and we have a malfunctioning government in Washington DC... :)
gearup328
Peter Steitz 1
I have to chime in here. If the general public is used to DIA then let them have it. We pilots and other aviation pros will still use KDEN. The general public doesn't care about ICAO or the proper aviation designations. CVG=Covington Kentucky. Don't confuse them--let them still think Cincinatti. ORD=Orchard Field. Let them still think Chicago. MCO=McCoy Field. Let them still think Orlando. I could go on and on. OK, one more. CAK. Up there in Northern Ohio, folks from Akron call it the Akron Canton airport. It's actually the Canton/Akron airport. Cities have their pride.
AWAAlum
AWAAlum 1
Lol no, cities do not have their pride. Citizens do. Cities don't have feelings.
orcas123
Tom Wilhite 0
Does the author really think that flight articles only correct if written in the lingo of a glorified buss driver. Get a life man
AWAAlum
AWAAlum 3
You could both attend the same English class.
Thumpkady
Steve Kady 1
Not sure why everyone is bashing the media here. They were not allowed on the property, no spokesperson gave them any information. For the most part, they got most of their infor from Centennial Airport where the plane is based. The plane should have landed there instead of DIA
Bernie20910
Bernie20910 1
Well, if you're not sure, you could try reading all the comments, they're pretty self-explanatory, but evidently you already did that, since you know "everyone is bashing the media" so... Troll much?
AirBalance
Jeff Lewis 2
I am not trolling, and I do not think Steve Kady was trolling, either. I agree with his sense that (especially at the top of this stack of comments) there is a lot of media bashing. Yes, the media do get a few details wrong, but in no small part because of the FAA and others in aviation. The agency practices too much informational opacity and prefers the media to just pass on their carefully crafted press releases. The manufacturers and pilots are chronically defensive about ANY coverage that shows ANY safety issue in aviation.

But, really, to bash the media over 'DIA' vs. 'DEN'? Most of us must be WAY too bored to be debating this. The vast majority of comments posted on this specific article are WAY below the quality we like to expect in FlightAware discussions.
AWAAlum
AWAAlum 1
Man oh man, don't sugar coat it folks. It almost seems as though most posters recently are using this forum to rid themselves of their angst. If we disagree about something, fine - but can we be civil about it? After reading through about 3/4 of the posts, it begins to feel a bit childish.
preacher1
preacher1 3
75 posts on here and a video of a belly landing and over 1/2 the thread is devoted to a argument about airport abbreviations or old movies, rather than discussion of why no gear extension as is normal.Pitiful.
gearup328
Peter Steitz 1
I can't believe what people will say on a blog when they are not sitting face to face. This thread is dead. Let me try and bring it back to the original line--emergency landing at Denver, gear extension problem. All commercial aircraft have several methods to get the gear down. #1-lower the dang handle. When you do this a high pressure valve opens, the uplocks unlock, a low pressure return line opens to let whatever fluid is in the cylinder to return to the reservoir. All this has to happen or the gear won't extend. The valves are usually in a "shuttle" so they work in tandem. #2-If there is a loss of hydraulic pressure, the uplocks can be unlocked and the return line valve opened mechanically by a cable going from the cockpit to each uplock. The gear then falls by gravity. There is also a hand pump to assist in this. In the case of the nose gear, you may have to speed up and let the ram air help. With the mains, a side slip or some G's will usually do the job. In both cases, a problem arises if the return line valve fails to open. This is called a "jam". The trapped fluid has to go somewhere. There isn't much you can do about this. The gear simply won't freefall. The other incident that can occur is with the nose gear. Because of the steering, the wheel can become jammed in the wheel well and not come down even with pressure. Rear engine jets usually have a "keel" running under the belly for the purpose of a total gear up landing. The Embraer 145 and Legacy have this. I don't know what it's composed of. Wing powered airplanes use the engines. Oh boy--$$$$$$$$$$. In this incident, there could have also been a gear door sequencing problem causing a gear to jam. We don't know.
preacher1
preacher1 5
84 posts arguing over Airport name and old movies, forgetting we have a Hawker making a belly landing. This one went way overboard.
AWAAlum
AWAAlum 2
I was typing almost word for word this post, preacher. This seems to be happening more and more often. Someone gets a bug up their bum about something as silly as what a reporters calls an airport and off everyone goes. Way far afield from what the story's about. Ca-razy! Everyone's an expert it would seem.
joelwiley
joel wiley 1
108th post- 11 with specific references to a/c, gear, hydraulics related. The rest off topic, more ad hominem attacks than on-topic refs. So this squawk is mimics an electronic media news report.

Bread and Circuses
Bernie20910
Bernie20910 1
Including 14 posts complaining about that. Oh, and some of those complaining about it...? Yep, they made their own posts on those same subjects they're complaining about. Can anyone say, "hypocrisy?"

So what all is the real problem here? When this squawk was first posted pretty much everyone said, "Meh... non-news item. Happens all the time. Why even bother reporting it?"

Then Sparkie took issue with the DIA designation in the headline, and began discussing how the media really needs to improve when it comes to aviation stories, a topic I've seen just about all of us agree with at one time or the other. There were a couple of discussions of the use of local nicknames for places in news reports, and what happens when those go global (still aviation related though, since it's about the designation for an airport for crying out loud), and then a bit of grumbling about that conversation not belonging here (kinda hard to see that, since it's a discussion ABOUT this story and this squawk - if not here, where?) and a few discussed the possible reasons for the gear failure. Yes, there were a few off-topic posts, including one threat of physical violence against Sparkie which no one seems to think is out of line) and a few folks now moaning about how the thread is "dead". With 108 (109 now) comments I'd hardly call it dead, and if the discussion of the airport designator is such a bad thing, why are so many of us taking part in it? Obviously it interests more than a couple of us, is aviation appropriate, and is on-topic for this squawk and news report. Y'all need to step back a moment and remember, this isn't just a site for the gearheads, who want to armchair diagnose the entire hydraulic system of the aircraft, and it isn't just a site for pilots, or those in the aviation industry. Yeah, the site has features that are tailored for those folks, but overall the site is an aviation information resource for the general public. Everybody. Anyone who has an interest in aviation is, and should be, welcome here, whatever their level of interest or knowledge. And if that's not true then why is the site open to the general public? Y'all want to limit discussion of squawks and news items to just the hardcore aviation people? Then do it. Lock the place up tight and don't let anyone else in. But as long as it's open to anyone who wants to apply for an account then y'all need to understand that not every conversation on here is going to be hardcore aviationspeak.
AWAAlum
AWAAlum 1
I believe, Bernie, the gripes are warranted since, as you say, the do concern the story - kind of -but just mistakes made in the story, not about the story itself. The topic of the story.
preacher1
preacher1 1
Tks Peter for the explanation and trying to get the thing back on track but I got a feeling it is a lost cause.
joelwiley
joel wiley 1
Maybe it should be sent to the Banter Thread.
egnilk66
egnilk66 1
Not to mention....Beryllium dust.
toolguy105
toolguy105 1
What you all do not understand that even as awesome as this landing was, it is something that happens frequently with private aircraft. Now a jet aircraft is out of the ordinary and the pilot showed some awesome airmanship in setting the plane down. Fact is everyone walked away and the plane will fly again after some major repair work.

The name thing is important because with just about everything in aviation and some other occupations there is a great deal of history and pride behind a name or acronym. Look at that fight the Washington Football team is putting over there name. Try getting the New York City Fire Department to change there name from FDNY to say NYFD which better reflects who they may be. You want to talk about a revolution. There is a great deal of history, Pride and sprits behind some of these designations. Calling someone or something by the wrong name is a slap in the face. It hits right at the pride we have in the thing or ourselves. That is what is at work here over the post.

DIA is long gone DEN is the Denver airport. Friendship airport in Baltimore is long gone it is now Baltimore Washington Thurgood Marshal International Airport; BWI for short. None of the new reporters would even think of referring to BWI as Freindship any more.
bbabis
Bill Babis 0
Obviously a retraction problem that turned into an extension problem. I'm not at all familiar with the 800 but it must have been a jammed gear issue or a failure that disabled all means of gear extension. Ultimately a good job by the crew as all aboard are fine with a good story to tell.
sparkie624
sparkie624 0
They were actually having a Hydraulic Issue that affected the gear and that really does not explain why they did not or could not do a manual extension.. I am sure that plane has a method of manual extension even though I have no direct experience with this bird.
Steve1822
Steve1822 3
Jim gavey's post above answers your comment.
sparkie624
sparkie624 0
That message even though 2 hours old, was not displayed when I posted my message.
sparkie624
sparkie624 -2
A Non News event.. Not surprising only one desperate station reported it. The crew did a great job with a maintenance problem on board the a/c and made a safe landing...
btweston
btweston 3
You're... adorable...
erdufay
eric dufay -1
(Duplicate Squawk Submitted)

Flight path of HA800XP that made gear up landing at DEN

A HA800XP took off from APA then had a hydrolic issue and made a gear up landing at DEN. Both pilots and 3 PAX were ok.

http://flightaware.com/live/flight/N694ES
genethemarine
Gene spanos -2
How many across our nation's grid does this same type of incident occur...

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